A character analysis of albert camus book the stranger

Do you sometimes wonder why the author received such great acclaim?

A character analysis of albert camus book the stranger

It is the absurdity of human conventions that has us doing such things. For the last thirty years I have studiously avoided reading this book. In high school friends one of them even became my ex-wife told me it was a great book about a man condemned to die because he was an outsider.

A character analysis of albert camus book the stranger

Later I was told that this book was a story about something much like the Azaria Chamberlain case. But after 30 years of avoiding reading this book I have finally relented and read it.

A character analysis of albert camus book the stranger

I particularly liked the man who kept falling behind in the march to the cemetery and would take short cuts. Okay, so it is black humour, but Camus was more or less French — so black humour is more or less obligatory. I had gotten the distinct impression from all of my previous discussions about this book that the guy ends up dead.

In fact, this is not the case — he ends up at the point in his life where he has no idea if he will be freed or not. The Priest who comes to him at the end is actually quite certain that he will be freed. The most interesting part of the book to me was the very end, the conversation with the priest.

I am definitely not the same kind of Atheist as Camus. To Camus there is no truth, the world is essentially absurd and all that exists is the relative truth an individual places on events and ideas.

This makes the conversation with the priest fascinatingly interesting. To the priest the prisoner who is facing death is — by necessity — someone who is interested in God. Not this little black duck.

Now, if I was in that cell I would have argued with the priest too — but I would not have argued in the same way that Meursault argues. Now, this is a reasonable response. What is very interesting is that the priest cannot accept this as an answer.

SparkNotes: The Stranger: Meursault

The world is not allowed to have such a person in it — if such a person really did exist then it would be a fundamental challenge to the core beliefs of the priest. So, he has to assume Meursault is either lying to him or is trying to taunt him.

And look, yes, there is much to this — but this ends up being too easy. So, what can I say?And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie - Literary analysis: theme The main theme of this novel work is a powerful journey that lead unknown strangers on this dull island where each one of them life is at stake between survival and fate.

Literary analysis: How Meursault is indifferent in The Stranger, by Albert Camus Although Meursault is the title character and narrator of Albert Camus’ short novel The Stranger, he is also a somewhat flat character. Albert Camus wrote The Stranger during the Existentialist movement, which explains why the main character in the novel, Meursault, is characterized as detached and emotionless, two of the aspects of existentialism.

In Meursault, Camus creates a character he intends his readers to relate to, because. Meursault. Meursault is psychologically detached from the world around him.

Events that would be very significant for most people, such as a marriage proposal or a parent’s death, do not matter to him, at least not on a sentimental level.

Tell Us Your Least Favorite Book & We'll Tell You If You're Going to Flunk Out of High School. Please note: This is a summary and analysis of the book, not the original book.

The Stranger, by Albert Camus, is a French philosophical novel written in the leslutinsduphoenix.com the novel, we are introduced to our narrator, Monsieur Meursault.

Camus, The Stranger