Writing activities first graders

OVERVIEW In this lesson, students complete two prewriting activities, one on brainstorming ideas using story maps, and one on creating beginnings of stories.

Writing activities first graders

Write sentences and fragments on the board. A cat ran up a tree. Jack skipped up the hill. The shiny blue car. We all know what words are.

A sentence is a group of words that is complete in itself. Also there should be a verb, which describes what the noun is doing or what the noun is.

Discuss each example and lead the students to understand that the sentence at least has a subject and a verb. Allow only 15 minutes for them to find two nouns, cut them out and glue them to the construction paper.

You may want to hold up a magazine and give them a few examples. Gather the papers and place them face down on the floor or table. Instruct students to choose one square and return to their desks.

Instruct the students to look at their nouns and come up with one verb that tells what the noun is doing or what the noun is.

Have each student stand and share. Then ask another student to put the words together in a short sentence. The picture is a baby The person holding the picture says a verb: Writing a sentence is like making a sandwich. The bread is the noun or subject. The meat is the verb. But sometimes we like to have more things on the sandwich: For a sentence, extra words that describe the subject or the verb can be added.

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Ask for suggestions of words that could describe the nouns. For example, you could say the shiny car or the furry cat. Write a few examples on the board as you brainstorm.

Next ask for verbs, words that describe what the noun is or is doing. How did the car stop? Are they still complete sentences? How do you know? Notice that when I have written the complete sentence I put a capital upper case letter at the beginning and a punctuation mark at the end.

That can be a period, a question mark or an exclamation mark. Place the cards on the floor facedown again. Students should choose a card. The assignment is to write a sentence about the picture using a noun subjectadjective to describe the nounverb, adverb describes the verb.

Remember to use a capital letter and punctuation at the end of the sentence. Bring papers individually to share with the teacher.December Writing Prompts - Writing prompt topics include: Rosa Parks, the phonograph and CD's, Human Rights Day, Snow and the first day of winter, and more.

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writing activities first graders

Find and save ideas about First grade writing on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Second grade writing, Writing checklist and Writing rubrics. First grade writing worksheets teach graders how write simple sentences.

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Use our first grade writing worksheets with your child. Loads of first grade writing activities - Need to spend time. These worksheets, learning centers, and games can be used to teach the alphabet.

Below you'll find a large selection of alphabet banners, tracing worksheets, letter games, and crafts. First Grade. Centers. We hope to add more to this site in the future. If you are from the Billings District and have a picture of a center you would be willing to share, please email it to [email protected] 1st Grade Level 2 Phonics Worksheets, L blends, R blends, Long a, Silent e, Long e, Vowel digraphs ee, ea, ai, ay, word families, y as long e, consonant blends, word formation, how to read, homophones, short a, short e, short i, l vs.

r blends, cr vs. gr, long vowels, tr vs. dr. Check out the listening area for this level for listening to match. In this lesson, students complete two prewriting activities, one on brainstorming ideas using story maps, and one on creating beginnings of stories.

They then work on two collaborative-writing activities in which they draft an "oversized" story on chart paper. Before starting the activities, the.

Free printable 1st grade Worksheets, word lists and activities. | GreatSchools